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WELCOME TO THE OFFICIAL WEBSITE OF THE
AGENT ORANGE ASSOCIATION OF CANADA Inc.

THE GROWING SOURCE OF INFORMATION ABOUT
CHEMICAL SPRAYINGS ON CFB GAGETOWN AND
SURROUNDING COMMUNITIES FROM 1956 TO 1984


“WHAT OUR ASSOCIATION CONTINUES TO ADVOCATE FOR“
after December 22, 2010

Over one billion grams of Agent Orange, Agent Purple and Agent White were sprayed on CFB Gagetown and surrounding communities from 1956 to 1984 consisting of 3.3 million litres and kilograms of Dioxin, Picloram, 2,4-D + 2,4,5-T, and Hexachlorobenzene

In May/June of 2005, the CBC National, CTV, Global TV and hundreds of newspapers across Canada reported the ongoing stories of the spraying of Agent Orange and Agent Purple at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Gagetown, New Brunswick, Canada.

Document A-2004-00207 (See DND Documents in our Menu) was obtained through the Access to Information Act from The Department of National Defence (DND) Freedom of Information Directorate in Ottawa.

This document, authored by DND, - a collection of letters, emails, pictures, charts, diagrams and transcripts of briefings contained the decades-hidden truth about the severity of the sprayings on CFB Gagetown.

The Agent Orange document, as it became known, showed the extent of the sprayings of Dioxin, Hexachlorobenzene and Picloram contaminated defoliants for a 28-year period over an area of 181,000 acres on CFB Gagetown.

Our Department of National Defence claimed the U.S. military had been invited to test only two and one half barrels (483 litres) of Agent Orange and Agent Purple and other unregistered herbicides for a total of three days in June 1966 and four days in June of 1967.

However, DND’s own documents show that shocking amounts were sprayed for 10 years before the Americans sprayed their miniscule 483 litres in the summers of ’66 & ’67 and DND continued to spray millions of litres for a further 20 years after the Americans had packed up and gone home.

During the 28 years that DND sprayed, the enormity of the spray exposure and drift became evident as thousands of civilians and military personnel became sick and were/are dying from being poisoned by the carcinogenic toxins in Oromocto, CFB Gagetown and all of the communities surrounding CFB Gagetown

On the top and bottom of our website, we have used a portion of a close-up image of poppies, grown here in Canada, as a tribute to our veterans and civilians who have been made sick, and for those who have died.


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Medical Experiments...

1950 - 1953) The U.S. Army releases chemical clouds over six
American and Canadian cities. Residents in Winnipeg, Canada, where a
highly toxic chemical called cadmium is dropped, subsequently
experience high rates of respiratory illnesses (Cockburn and St. Clair,
eds.).
In order to determine how susceptible an American city could be to
biological attack, the U.S. Navy sprays a cloud of Bacillus globigii
bacteria from ships over the San Francisco shoreline. According to
monitoring devices situated throughout the city to test the extent of
infection, the eight thousand residents of San Francisco inhale five
thousand or more bacteria particles, many becoming sick with
pneumonia-like symptoms (Goliszek).
Dr. Joseph Strokes of the University of Pennsylvania infects 200 female prisoners with viral hepatitis to study the disease (Sharav).
Doctors at the Cleveland City Hospital study changes in cerebral blood flow by injecting test subjects with spinal anesthesia, inserting needles in their jugular veins and brachial arteries, tilting their heads down and, after massive blood loss causes paralysis and fainting, measuring their blood pressure. They often perform this experiment multiple times on the same subject (Goliszek).
Dr. D. Ewen Cameron, later of MKULTRA infamy due to his 1957 to1964
experiments on Canadians, publishes an article in the British Journal of Physical Medicine, in which he describes experiments that entail forcing schizophrenic patients at Manitoba's Brandon Mental Hospital to lie
naked under 15- to 200-watt red lamps for up to eight hours per day.
His other experiments include placing mental patients in an electric cage
that overheats their internal body temperatures to 103 degrees
Fahrenheit, and inducing comas by giving patients large injections of
insulin (Goliszek).
(1951)
The U.S. Navy's Project Bluebird is renamed Project Artichoke and
begins human medical experiments that test the effectiveness of LSD,
sodium pentothal and hypnosis for the interrogative purposes described
in Project Bluebird's objectives (1950) (Goliszek).
The U.S. Army secretly contaminates the Norfolk Naval Supply Center in Virginia and Washington, D.C.'s National Airport with a strain of bacteria chosen because African-Americans were believed to be more susceptible
http://www.ahrp.org/history/chronology.php



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The solar-powered sea slug Elysia chlorotica can live entirely from energy from the sun. It's about three centimetres long

A green sea slug found off North America's east coast not only looks like a leaf, but can also make food out of sunlight, just like a plant.
U.S. researchers have found that the sea slug Elysia chlorotica can photosynthesize, using energy from light to convert carbon dioxide into sugars
Saturday, Jan. 23, 2010
Leaf-Like Sea Slug Feeds on Light
Source: CBC News
Posted: 01/23/10 10:08AM
Filed Under: Science & Tech
A green sea slug found off North America's east coast not only looks like a leaf, but can also make food out of sunlight, just like a plant.
U.S. researchers have found that the sea slug Elysia chlorotica can photosynthesize, using energy from light to convert carbon dioxide into sugars.



The solar-powered sea slug Elysia chlorotica can live entirely from energy from the sun. It's about three centimetres long.
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Amazing Discoveries
The solar-powered sea slug Elysia chlorotica can live entirely from energy from the sun. It's about three centimetres long.
PNAS
AP



"If you shine light on these slugs, they fix carbon dioxide and make oxygen just like a plant," Sidney Pierce of the University of South Florida told CBC Radio's Quirks & Quarks.
Pierce reported his findings Jan. 7 at the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, and has submitted his research to the journal Symbiosis.
The slugs look just like a leaf, green and about three centimetres long, and are found off the east coast of North America from Nova Scotia to Florida.
They acquire the ability to photosynthesize by eating algae and incorporating the plants' tiny chlorophyll-containing structures, called chloroplasts, into their own cells.
"Certain cells that line the walls of [the slugs'] digestive tubules are able to actually take up the chloroplasts from the algae, and they sequester them in the cells for very long periods of time," said Pierce.
Pierce said the chloroplasts can live inside the slugs' cells for nine or 10 months, nearly the entire lifetime of the slug, and can provide the animal with all the energy it needs.
"It can complete its entire life cycle, including reproduction, just on photosynthesis," he said.
With the help of radioactive trackers, Pierce found that the slugs are using the chloroplasts to make new chlorophyll, the green pigment that makes photosynthesis possible.
Gene Transfer a Revelation
The chloroplasts from algae aren't enough in themselves to allow the slugs to live off the sun. The process of photosynthesis requires enzymes and other proteins to keep the chloroplasts working.
"That requires a lot of genes that are present in the algal cell, and so those have been transferred as well," said Pierce.
At some point in the evolution of these sea slugs, genes from the algae transferred over and now reside in the genome of the slug.
"We found 14 or 15 algal genes so far and I'm pretty confident that we're going to find dozens more," said Pierce.
Gene transfers are common in single-celled organisms, but Pierce said this is the first time it has been described in multicellular organisms.
Exactly how the genes got from the algae to the slug isn't clear, but Pierce said research into this mechanism could lead to advances in gene therapy and genetic engineering.
Pierce said gene therapists are "trying to insert genes from one organism to another to fix genetically based diseases, and honestly that doesn't work very well yet, but these slugs have figured that out."
The mechanism could also be important in the study of evolution, giving biologists a new way to explain how organisms acquired certain genes.
"You don't have to sit around waiting for a random mutation to occur. You can take a gene or a group of genes, as is the case with the slugs, and really give yourself a real evolutionary boost," said Pierce.
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